Immigration & Diversity news headlines – August 28, 2012

IMMIGRATION AND DIVERSITY

Faith in decline (Irfan Husain, DAWN)
In Canada, where I am currently, I have been frequently asked about, the 11-year old Christian girl from Islamabad facing prosecution under our draconian Blasphemy Laws. I’m sure other Pakistanis abroad must be facing the same predicament. How do you defend the indefensible?
http://dawn.com/2012/08/27/faith-in-decline/

Polarizing Toronto activist deported to Nigeria (Kim Mackrael, Globe and Mail)
Self-described victims-rights advocate Kemi Omololu-Olunloyo was deported to Nigeria last week, after a lengthy battle with immigration officials over her status in Canada. “I was deported and it was a shame on the immigration system,” she wrote in an online message to The Globe and Mail on Monday. Outspoken and often controversial, Ms. Omololu-Olunloyo was a polarizing figure in many of the Toronto communities in which she worked. Some bereaved family members praised her efforts to bring attention to a loved one’s death, while others viewed her as a self-promoter, thrusting herself into the spotlight to speak on their behalf.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/polarizing-toronto-activist-deported-to-nigeria/article4504322/

Bank of Canada Design Nixed for Being Too Asian (Karina Palmitesta, Schema Magazine)
Recent reports show that in 2009, the Bank of Canada caved to focus group results and changed the ethnicity of a woman depicted on a draft of the new $100 bill. Apparently, this woman—shown peering into a microscope next to a bottle of insulin and a coil of DNA—looked too Asian. Some focus group participants took issue with the idea of an Asian representing Canada. Others pointed out that showing the woman looking into a microscope reinforces stereotypes about Asian people excelling at sciences. But the message was loud and clear: an Asian person did not belong in the design.
http://www.schemamag.ca/archive2/2012/08/bank_of_canada_design_nixed_fo.php

Youth roundtable on citizenship (Kendall Anderson, Samara)
Do you know a young person who would like to help shape citizenship education in Canada? Learning for a Sustainable Future and Deloitte are accepting applications for youth (16-25) to participate in a national roundtable discussion on the role of education in inspiring responsible citizenship. The youth group will also discuss and advise on the creation and promotion of a competition for secondary school students to develop the “Canadian Code of Responsibilities and Duties” that complements the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
http://www.samaracanada.com/samarablog/samara-main-blog/2012/08/27/youth-roundtable-on-citizenship

Old prejudices take longer to die in Canada (Bernie Smith, Canada.com)
One redeeming feature of the London Olympic Games was the refreshing display of jingoistic patriotism, not always present in UK. No matter what colour, creed or religion, the home-based multiethnic competitors were cheered on both in victory and defeat by exuberant British fans. With the sad commentary surrounding the design of the new Canadian $100-bill, it appears that old prejudices take longer to die in our own country. The design was drawn with a female medical technician using a microscope; focus groups objected to her Asian features, so the technician now has Caucasian features.
http://www.canada.com/prejudices+take+longer+Canada/7151018/story.html

Canada’s new immigration rules – smart or dumb? (Werner Patels)
I wasn’t fortunate enough to have been born in Canada, but a lifetime ago, I decided to become a Canadian all the same – a decision I’ve never come to regret (except at tax time, perhaps). When I filed my application for immigration, I scored maximum points in virtually all categories – age, skills, in-demand qualifications, language skills, etc. In fact, my case must have been so ideal and straightforward that it was all done and squared away within less than seven months. Based on my own experience, I was always incredulous when I heard about stories of applicants who remained in queue not only for months, but years. But unfortunately, even waiting for close to ten years has been the norm, rather than the exception. I wasn’t fortunate enough to have been born in Canada, but a lifetime ago, I decided to become a Canadian all the same – a decision I’ve never come to regret (except at tax time, perhaps). When I filed my application for immigration, I scored maximum points in virtually all categories – age, skills, in-demand qualifications, language skills, etc. In fact, my case must have been so ideal and straightforward that it was all done and squared away within less than seven months. Based on my own experience, I was always incredulous when I heard about stories of applicants who remained in queue not only for months, but years. But unfortunately, even waiting for close to ten years has been the norm, rather than the exception.

REFUGEES

Risks Of Refugee Health Cuts Starting To Show (Amy Boughner, care2.com)
Canadian citizens and doctors have been fighting the Harper government’s changes to refugee health care every way they know how and now they have proof of the side effect the cuts can cause. The government cut access to health care for all refugees waiting for their applications to go through except in cases of threats to public health. Doctors have warned the government that people could die due to these changes, even interrupting minister’s press conferences to speak out against them. On June 18, more than 2,000 health care professional held a national day of action protesting the changes. The cuts took effect June 30, 2012.
http://www.care2.com/causes/risks-of-refugee-health-cuts-starting-to-show.html

POVERTY / HEALTH / HOMELESSNESS / SOCIAL INCLUSION

Bank of Canada governor says to end privatization of gains and socialization of losses (Keith Reynolds, rabble)
Here in B.C., Bank of Canada Governor Mark Carney’s speech to the Canadian Auto Workers convention got less attention than it seemed to get back east. It deserves more attention. The biggest news coming out of the event was not in the speech itself but in the question period afterwards. Here Carney told the CAW members that with hundreds of billions of dollars in their bank accounts, Canadian firms aren’t doing enough to drive economic growth and create new jobs.
http://rabble.ca/blogs/bloggers/behind-numbers/2012/08/bank-canada-governor-says-end-privatization-gains-and-socializ

CITY OF TORONTO / CITIES / CIVIC ENGAGEMENT

Tuesday’s headlines (Spacing Toronto)
A daily round up of mainstream media news on City Hall, Development, Teachers, Transit and Other News.
http://spacingtoronto.ca/2012/08/28/tuesdays-headlines-266/

Those who hold the key to the suburbs hold the key (John Ibbitson, Globe and Mail)
The proposed riding boundaries for 15 new Ontario seats in the House of Commons reinforce a core political truth: Whichever party dominates the burgeoning edge cities surrounding Toronto governs Canada. The Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission for Ontario released its proposed electoral map Monday, reflecting the 2011 census and a new federal law that expands the House of Commons by 30 seats, bringing it to 338. All of the new Ontario seats are located in the Greater Toronto Area or in cities close to it, apart from one new seat for Ottawa.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/john-ibbitson-those-who-hold-the-key-to-the-suburbs-hold-the-key-to-canada/article4504198/

Growing Ontario could get 15 new federal ridings (CBC)
Due to an increase in population, Ontario could be getting 15 new federal ridings. The Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission for Ontario says public hearings will be held this fall on the proposed new electoral map. The proposed new electoral districts are located in Brampton, Cambridge, Durham, Hamilton, Markham, Mississauga, Oakville, Ottawa, Simcoe, Toronto and York.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/story/2012/08/27/toronto-ontario-new-federal-ridings.html

SOCIAL INNOVATION / NONPROFITS

Why does the law restrict political engagement by charities? (Charityinfo)
In a previous article I outlined the strengthened restrictions on political advocacy by charities adopted in the 2012 Federal Budget. The new measures have fuelled speculation that the Federal Government was making known its objection to charities, notably environmental charities, publicly criticizing government policy. Whatever may have been the immediate motivation for the new measures, the renewed emphasis on regulating political advocacy raises for consideration the reasons why the law distinguishes charity and politics in the first place. Over the years courts have offered a number of reasons why political advocacy is not charitable at law. A review of the cases reveals why the restrictions on political engagement by charities have proven so controversial. Put simply, the reasons articulated by courts in support of the doctrine of political purposes are surprisingly deficient.
http://www.charityinfo.ca/articles/Why-does-the-law-restrict-political-engagement-by-charities

Registration now open for fall CRA charity information sessions (CharityVillage)
Featuring the latest in nonprofit news, jobs, information, tools and resources, CharityVillage is Canada’s leading online community for nonprofit and like-minded professionals – connecting them to ideas, opportunities and each other.
http://charityvillage.com/Content.aspx?topic=Registration_now_open_for_fall_CRA_charity_information_sessions

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marco

Communications in social services/social change, immigration, diversity & inclusion in Toronto. Wannabe librarian, interested in nonprofit tech innovation.

Communications in social services/social change, immigration, diversity & inclusion in Toronto. Wannabe librarian, interested in nonprofit tech innovation.

One Response to “Immigration & Diversity news headlines – August 28, 2012”

  1. […] Immigration & Diversity news headlines – August 28, 2012 IMMIGRATION AND DIVERSITY Faith in decline (Irfan Husain, DAWN) In… […]

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RT @amp6: Deporting six-year-olds: surreal story in today's NYT on 11,000 kids (and counting) in immigration court, sans lawyers. http:/...

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